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University of Tokyo - Welcome to Game Theory 

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Welcome to Game Theory
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Overview

Duration

21 hours

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Total fee

Free

Mode of learning

Online

Difficulty level

Beginner

Official Website

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Credential

Certificate

Welcome to Game Theory
 at 
Coursera 
Highlights

  • 21% started a new career after completing these courses.
  • Earn a shareable certificate upon completion.
  • Flexible deadlines according to your schedule.
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Welcome to Game Theory
 at 
Coursera 
Course details

Skills you will learn
More about this course
  • This course provides a brief introduction to game theory. Our main goal is to understand the basic ideas behind the key concepts in game theory, such as equilibrium, rationality, and cooperation. The course uses very little mathematics, and it is ideal for those who are looking for a conceptual introduction to game theory.
  • Business competition, political campaigns, the struggle for existence by animals and plants, and so on, can all be regarded as a kind of ?game,? in which individuals try to do their best against others. Game theory provides a general framework to describe and analyze how individuals behave in such ?strategic? situations.
  • This course focuses on the key concepts in game theory, and attempts to outline the informal basic ideas that are often hidden behind mathematical definitions. Game theory has been applied to a number of disciplines, including economics, political science, psychology, sociology, biology, and computer science. Therefore, a warm welcome is extended to audiences from all fields who are interested in what game theory is all about.
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Welcome to Game Theory
 at 
Coursera 
Curriculum

Why Do We Need Game Theory, and What Does it Tell Us?

Course Preview

1-1 What is Game Theory?

1-2 Modelling Social Problems as a "Game"

1-3 In Search for the Governing Principle

1-4 Concerns About a Mathematical Theory of Human Behavior

1-5 Let's Play a Game

Card Game Tutorial (No Audio)

1-6 John Nash Discovered the Governing Principle

1-7 Nash Equilibrium

1-8 Traffic Game in Reality

1-9 Location Game

1-10 Policies of Two Parties

Course Description

Syllabus

Card Game Challenge Instruction

(Supplementary Reading Material) Convergence to Nash Equilibrium in the Traffic Game

About Optional Challenge Problems

Supplemental explanation for Question 1, 2 and 3

Practice Quiz 1.1

Practice Quiz 1.2

Practice Quiz 1.3

Graded Quiz 1

Module 1 Optional Challenge Problems

Understanding Nash equilibrium

2-1 Nash Equilibrium and the Prisoner?s Dilemma

2-2 Coordination Game and Self-Fulfilling Prophecy

2-3 Market Competition

2-4 Why Do People Come to Play Nash Equilibrium? Part I

2-5 Why Do People Come to Play Nash Equilibrium? Part II

2-6 Why Do People Come to Play Nash Equilibrium? Part III

2-7 Stylized Facts and Nash Equilibrium

2-8 Make Yourself Unpredictable: Mixed Strategy Equilibrium

2-9 Sports Games and Game Theory

2-10 Nash Equilibrium Exists in All Games

About Optional Challenge Problems

Practice Quiz 2.1

Practice Quiz 2.2

Practice Quiz 2.3

Graded Quiz 2

Module 2 Optional Challenge Problems

Rationality, Knowledge, and Evolution in Games

3-1 Digression: The Card Game Revisited

3-2 Digression: How You Played the Card Game and Addressing the Concerns about Game Theory

3-3 ?Payoffs? in a Game: What Exactly Are Those Numbers?

3-4 What Does it Mean That a Player is Rational?

3-5 Domination: Strategies That Are ?Obviously Good or Bad?

3-6 Common Knowledge of Rationality

3-7 Low Rationality: What Happens if Players Are Not Very Smart?

3-8 Game Theory Under Zero-Intelligence: Biological Evolution

3-9 Fig Wasps Play a Nash Equilibrium

Aggregated Result of the Card Game Challenge

About Optional Challenge Problems

Supplemental explanation for Question 2, 3 and 4

Practice Quiz 3.1

Practice Quiz 3.2

Practice Quiz 3.3

Graded Quiz 3

Module 3 Optional Challenge Problems

Sustaining Cooperation

4-1 Group Rationality and The Rationality of Individuals

4-2 Why is Group Rationality Different From Rationality of Individuals?

4-3 Group Rationality vs. Rationality of Individuals in Biological Evolution

4-4 Group Rationality vs. Rationality of Individuals in Social Thought

4-5 How to Enforce Socially Desirable Outcomes

4-6 Cooperation of gas Stations in Long-Term Relationship Part I: Need For Cooperation

4-7 Cooperation of Gas Stations in Long-Term Relationship Part II: Mechanism of Cooperation

4-8 Reputation and Brand Name

4-9 Cooperation in Loosely Knit Organization

4-10 Summary of the Course

Final Message from the Instructor

(Supplementary Reading Material) Why People Discount Future Payoff?

About Optional Challenge Problems

Practice Quiz 4.1

Practice Quiz 4.2

Practice Quiz 4.3

Graded Quiz 4

Module 4 Optional Challenge Problems

Welcome to Game Theory
 at 
Coursera 
Admission Process

    Important Dates

    May 25, 2024
    Course Commencement Date

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