Paid Up Capital: Meaning and Examples

Paid Up Capital: Meaning and Examples

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Chanchal
Chanchal Aggarwal
Senior Executive Content
Updated on Mar 7, 2024 14:49 IST

Paid-up capital represents the funds received from shareholders in exchange for shares, signifying the company's equity capital. It indicates shareholders' financial commitment and is critical for assessing the company's funding and financial health.

Paid-Up Capital

Have you ever wondered what paid-up capital is and why it's important for businesses? Paid-up capital refers to the amount of money that a company has received from shareholders in exchange for the shares they own. The company uses this capital to finance its operations and growth. 

For instance, let's take a startup company that requires funds to expand its operations. In such a scenario, the company can raise funds by issuing shares to investors in exchange for their investment. The money these investors receive becomes part of the company's paid-up capital.

Table of Content

Paid Up Capital Meaning

Paid-up capital is the total amount of money a company has received from its shareholders for fully paid shares. The difference between authorised capital and paid-up capital is that authorized capital is the maximum amount a company can issue as shares, while paid-up capital is the actual amount received from shareholders for issued shares.

Essentially, Paid Up Capital shows the real funds raised through share issuance. This capital is vital for a company's operations and growth and signals the company's financial health and the commitment of its investors. The minimum paid-up capital for Public and Private company is different. 

In India, the minimum paid-up capital for private company is INR 1 lakh (equivalent to approximately USD 1,300). This means that a private company must receive at least INR 1 lakh from shareholders in exchange for the shares they own.  

The minimum paid-up capital for public company is INR 5 lakhs (equivalent to approximately USD 6,500). This means that a public company must receive at least INR 5 lakhs from shareholders in exchange for the shares they own.

Understanding Issue of Shares with Example
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Difference between Right Issue and Bonus Issue
Difference between Right Issue and Bonus Issue
The key difference between a bonus issue and a rights issue lies in their purpose and impact on shareholders. A bonus issue offers additional shares to shareholders for free, using...read more

Paid Up Share Capital Meaning

Paid-up share capital refers to the amount of money that a company has received from shareholders in exchange for the fully paid-up shares they own. When a company issues shares, it can receive payment for those shares in installments or in full. 

Paid-up share capital is the portion of the total share capital that shareholders have fully paid. The company uses this capital to finance its operations and growth. It is an important concept in corporate finance, as it represents the amount of money the company has received from shareholders and serves as a measure of its financial strength.mn 

Example of Paid Up Capital

Imagine a startup in India issuing 10,000 shares at Rs. 100 each. If all shares are bought, the paid-up capital is Rs. 10,00,000. This capital represents the money received from shareholders, crucial for the company’s operations and expansion, reflecting its financial strength in the Indian market.

What is the Difference Between Authorized Capital and Issued Capital?
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Authorized capital and issued capital are ways in which a company can raise money through shares. However, these two are different in several ways and still have many similarities. In...read more

Issued Capital: Meaning and Example
Issued Capital: Meaning and Example
Issued Capital signifies the total value of a company's issued shares, illustrating funds raised. Its importance lies in influencing company valuation, financial health, and strategic decisions. Proper reporting in financial...read more

Characteristics of Paid-up Capital

  • Paid-up capital is the amount of money a company receives from shareholders in exchange for the shares they own.
  • It represents the actual funds that the company has raised from investors.
  • Paid-up capital is not a company liability and cannot be withdrawn.
  • It serves as a measure of the financial strength of the company.
  • A company's amount of paid-up capital can impact its ability to borrow money or attract new investors.
  • Paid-up capital can be increased by issuing new shares or decreased through share buybacks.
  • Paid-up capital is an important concept in corporate finance, and it is often used to evaluate a company's financial health.

Difference Between Equity Share and Preference Share
Difference Between Equity Share and Preference Share
Ddifference between equity share and preference share is in what they offer. Equity shares provide investors with partial ownership while preference share offer fixed dividends to ins shareholders. Equity and...read more

Difference Between Money Market and Capital Market
Difference Between Money Market and Capital Market
The money market is a part of financial markets where instruments with high liquidity and short-term maturities are traded. Short-term securities with a maturity period of one year or less...read more

Importance of Paid-Up Capital

Financial Stability: Paid-up capital indicates the actual funds a company has received from its shareholders in exchange for shares. It represents the company’s real financial commitment, contributing to its stability and solvency, allowing it to cover initial expenses and sustain operations.

Credibility with Stakeholders: A higher paid-up capital can enhance a company's credibility among investors, creditors, and partners. It signifies the shareholders' confidence in the business, making it more attractive to potential investors and lending institutions.

Regulatory Compliance: Legal minimums exist for companies' paid-up capital in many jurisdictions, including India. Meeting these requirements is essential for legal registration, operation, and compliance, avoiding penalties or operational restrictions.

Expansion and Growth: Paid-up capital provides the essential funds needed for expansion projects, research and development, and scaling operations. Companies with substantial paid-up capital can invest in growth opportunities without relying heavily on debt financing.

Creditworthiness: Banks and financial institutions often consider companies with significant paid-up capital more creditworthy. This enhances their ability to secure loans and credit facilities at favorable terms, facilitating further business development and expansion efforts.

Subscribed Capital: Example and Process
Subscribed Capital: Example and Process
Subscribed capital is the total value of shares investors have committed to buy from a company. It indicates investor interest and potential funds, crucial for a company's growth, yet to...read more

Called-Up Capital: Meaning, Example and More
Called-Up Capital: Meaning, Example and More
Called-up capital is the amount shareholders are required to pay on their shares in a company. It represents the portion of authorized capital that is demanded by the company for...read more

Conclusion

Paid-up capital is a critical component of a company's financial health. It represents the actual funds that the company has raised from shareholders and serves as a measure of its financial strength. Paid-up capital can impact a company's ability to borrow money or attract new investors, making it an important concept in corporate finance. 

Companies can increase their paid-up capital by issuing new shares or decrease it by buying back shares. Understanding the nuances of paid-up capital is crucial for businesses to make informed decisions and ensure their long-term financial stability.

About the Author
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Chanchal Aggarwal
Senior Executive Content

Chanchal is a creative and enthusiastic content creator who enjoys writing research-driven, audience-specific and engaging content. Her curiosity for learning and exploring makes her a suitable writer for a variety ... Read Full Bio