Financial Lease: Meaning, Features and Advantages

Financial Lease: Meaning, Features and Advantages

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Chanchal
Chanchal Aggarwal
Senior Executive Content
Updated on Dec 14, 2023 00:39 IST

A financial lease is a contractual arrangement where a lessee obtains the use of an asset for most of its economic life, resembling ownership. This type of lease comes with a purchase option, enabling the lessee to buy the asset at the lease term’s end. It offers advantages like cost distribution and tax benefits. But also comes with commitments and potentially higher total costs.

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Imagine you want to use a big machine for your business, like a printing press or a truck. But you don’t want to buy it outright. Instead, you decide to rent it for a long time, almost like borrowing it for a big part of its life. This kind of renting is called a financial lease.

In this article, we will understand the Financial lease meaning, its features, advantages and disadvantages.

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Table of Content

What is Financial Lease?

A financial lease is a rental agreement where one party (lessee) rents an asset from another party (lessor) for a substantial portion of the asset’s useful life. The lessee benefits almost like an owner, taking on maintenance costs and risks. It includes a purchase option, often at a lower price, giving the lessee a chance to buy the asset when the lease ends. The lease is typically non-cancelable, and the leased asset appears on the lessee’s balance sheet. This arrangement offers tax and depreciation advantages. It’s a way to use an asset without a big upfront cost, like a long-term rental with a chance to buy.

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Example of a Financial Lease

A construction firm requires a costly crane. Instead of buying, they opt for a financial lease. The leasing company owns the crane, and the firm pays regular amounts comprising interest and principal. At the lease term’s end, the firm can purchase the crane at a reduced cost. This arrangement enables the firm to utilize the crane seamlessly, avoid heavy initial expenses, and potentially secure ownership later.

Read more: Operating Lease which is another type of lease commonly used in businesses. 

Key Features of Financial Lease

Duration and Ownership Transfer

A financial lease is a type of lease arrangement where the lessee (the person or entity renting the asset) enjoys benefits. Also, they have responsibilities similar to ownership throughout the lease term. The lease duration is generally a significant portion of the asset’s useful life. Often covering the majority of its economic life. As a result, the lessee is essentially committed to using the asset for most of its productive years.

Purchase Option

Financial leases often include a purchase option at the end of the lease term. This option allows the lessee to buy the leased asset at a predetermined price. It is typically lower than the asset’s fair market value. This feature allows the lessee to eventually acquire ownership of the asset once the lease term concludes.

Bargain Purchase Option

A unique aspect of financial leases is the presence of a “bargain purchase option.” This option signifies that the predetermined purchase price stated in the lease agreement is significantly lower than the anticipated fair market value at the end of the lease. This provision further incentivizes the lessee to exercise the purchase option and acquire the asset.

Risk and Reward Transfer

Financial leases involve the transfer of both risks and rewards associated with assets. The ownership from the lessor (the entity owning the asset) to the lessee. This means that the lessee is responsible for maintenance costs, insurance, and other expenses related to the leased asset. Additionally, any potential gains from the asset’s future sale value accrue to the lessee. It aligns their interests more closely with those of an owner.

Non-Cancelable Agreement

Financial leases are typically non-cancelable agreements. It means that the lessee is obligated to fulfil the lease terms and payments as agreed upon in the contract. Unlike operating leases, where lessees might have more flexibility to terminate the lease early, financial leases create a stronger and more binding commitment between the lessee and the lessor for the specified lease period.

Amortization and Reporting

In a financial lease, the lessee treats the leased asset as if they own it for accounting purposes. The asset is recorded on the lessee’s balance sheet. They also report the lease payments as a combination of interest expense and reduction in liability (amortization). This accounting treatment reflects the economic reality of the lessee’s near-ownership experience during the lease term.

Tax and Depreciation Benefits

Financial leases often provide the lessee with tax and depreciation benefits. Since the leased asset is considered owned for accounting purposes. The lessee can usually claim depreciation deductions on the asset, which can reduce taxable income. Additionally, interest payments associated with the lease may also be tax-deductible, further enhancing the financial advantages for the lessee.

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Advantages of Financial Lease

Cost Distribution: Financial leasing lets businesses access assets without a large upfront payment. It makes it easier to manage cash flow and allocate resources effectively.

Preserved Capital: By opting for a financial lease, companies can conserve their capital for other essential needs. Such as operations, expansion, or unexpected expenses, instead of tying it up in purchasing assets.

Tax Benefits: Businesses can take lease payments as business expenses. It potentially leads to tax deductions, which can result in lower taxable income and reduced tax liability.

Off-Balance Sheet Financing: Financial leases may allow businesses to keep the leased assets off their balance sheets or show them as operating expenses, potentially improving financial ratios and creditworthiness.

Easy Upgrades: At the end of the lease term, businesses can easily upgrade to newer or more advanced equipment, keeping up with industry trends and technological advancements.

Fixed Payments: With financial leasing, monthly payments are usually fixed, providing a clear and predictable expense structure that helps with budgeting and financial planning.

Ownership Option: Many financial leases offer a purchase option at the end of the lease term, allowing businesses to eventually acquire ownership of the asset if it aligns with their long-term plans.

Flexibility: Financial leases can be tailored to match the specific needs of a business. It includes lease duration, payment schedules, and other terms, providing a higher level of flexibility compared to traditional ownership.

Disadvantages of Financial Lease

Disadvantages for Lessor

Asset Residual Value Risk: Lessor faces the risk of the leased asset’s value decreasing more than anticipated, potentially leading to lower returns if the lessee doesn’t exercise the purchase option.

Maintenance Uncertainties: The lessor might still be responsible for major maintenance or repairs, which could impact profitability if not adequately planned for.

Credit and Default Risk: The lessee’s financial stability directly affects the lessor, as default or financial troubles could lead to payment disruptions and potential loss.

Disadvantages for Lessee

Long-Term Commitment: Lessee is tied to a long-term commitment. It can limit flexibility to adapt to changing business needs or market conditions.

Higher Total Cost: Over the lease term, the lessee might end up paying more than the asset’s actual value due to interest and fees, making it less cost-effective in the long run.

Maintenance Responsibility: Lessee is responsible for maintaining the asset. It can lead to additional costs and complexities, especially for specialized equipment.

Uncertain Future Value: The decision to exercise the purchase option at the lease end can be uncertain due to factors affecting the asset’s future market value.

Limited Control: Lessee has limited control over modifications, upgrades, or selling the asset if the business needs change.

Credit and Qualification Requirements: Securing a financial lease often requires meeting credit and qualification criteria. It might be challenging for some businesses.
Ownership Equity Absence: Unlike ownership, no equity is built through financial leasing, potentially missing out on asset appreciation benefits.

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FAQs

What is a financial lease?

A financial lease is a lease arrangement where a lessee rents an asset for a significant portion of its useful life, resembling ownership, with an option to purchase at the end.

How does a financial lease differ from an operating lease?

Unlike operating leases, financial leases transfer risks and rewards of ownership to the lessee, and the leased asset often appears on the lessee's balance sheet.

What are the benefits of a financial lease for lessees?

Benefits include cost distribution, preserved capital, potential tax deductions, easy upgrades, and ownership option.

Can the lessee return the asset before the lease term ends?

Typically, financial leases have non-cancellable terms, making it less flexible than operating leases for early returns.

About the Author
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Chanchal Aggarwal
Senior Executive Content

Chanchal is a creative and enthusiastic content creator who enjoys writing research-driven, audience-specific and engaging content. Her curiosity for learning and exploring makes her a suitable writer for a variety ... Read Full Bio

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